Navigation path

News

Create, read and comment news on interoperability solutions for public administrations

Open source helps Czech libraries protect and show historic documents

(
 
)
1/5 | 1 votes |

Libraries in the Czech Republic are sharing and re-using a specialised open source content management system, Kramerius, to preserve historic documents and make them available online. The Kramerius software is developed with the support of the Library of the Academy of Sciences, the National Library, both in Prague, and the Moravian Library in the city of Brno.

A case study on Kramerius was published this week on Joinup.

The software is intended to be used for digitized library collections, monographs and periodicals. It can be used for maps, musical scores and illustrations and to provide access to selections of documents, articles and chapters.

Kramerius is part of a larger 'Czech Digital Library Project', aiming to digitise, help preserve for the long-term and make accessible the greater part of the resources of the National Library and the Moravian Library. "With the help of robotic scanners, over 50 million pages, or approximately 300 thousand volumes, should be digitized by 2019."

The Czech Digital Library project has a budget of CZK 20 million (about 800,000 euro), for the next three years.

System Kramerius is part of a larger National Digital Library Project, that aims to digitise, help preserve for the long-term and make accessible the greater part of the resources of the National Library and the Moravian State Library. "With the help of robotic scanners, over 50 million pages, or approximately 300 thousand volumes, should be digitized by 2019."

Floods
"One of the impulses that led to the creation of the Kramerius system was the floods of 2002", the case study shows. This flood damaged a large number of books in Czech archives and libraries. "In the process of recovering the damaged documents it was decided to make digital copies publicly accessible."

The open source solution is proving popular because it was originally built for the National Library and the Library of the Academy of Sciences, says its director, Martin Lhoták. "Other libraries considered this a good reason to start adopting the software for their own needs. Trust in open source products is based on who develops them and how many users already use them."

More information: 
Joinup case study